Minge Marauder

Oct 21

brokenlanguage:

hfml:

that time Jessica Lange literally killed it in Titus

Essential.

Oct 21

stimutax:

70 Most Useful Sites on the Internet

(via mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers)

Oct 18

(Source: weekend-reanimator, via destitutedynasty)

Oct 18

sexhobolith:

Was just browsing frilly shirts on Amazon.

I laughed so hard I woke my husband who was sleeping two rooms over.

(via queerlittlemermaid)

Oct 14

kylekallgren:

corpsexhands:

fujoshifeminism:

roachpatrol:

videodante:

Read them all here, I felt like this should be remembered somewhere because it’s really good.

YOO. 

If you try to tell me the Hunger Games isn’t good enough to go toe-to-toe with shit like 1984, Lord of the Flies, and Farenheit 451 then we are gonna have to throw the fuck down

This. All of this. It applies to shoujo manga and anime as well.

YES YES YES!!

i remember reading about gothic literature in the 18th century, and how these novels all started off being called romances (borrowing from the french term) and a lot of their authors were women. when men entered the game prominently, they started calling their works novels—which were more ‘logical’ and based in more ‘honourable’ traditions of classical works, to give a distinction from the sentimental gothic works of women authors*.

and actually (and i hope i’m right here, i’m going off memory) gothic fiction was coined that rather early on and was meant to be an insult. because  when gothic fiction got its start, gothic architecture was so passé (this was well before the victorian gothic revival) and everyone was doing, i think, like neo-classical. which was a big cultural thing, w the age of enlightenment digging up classical greek and roman works & getting back into philosophizing etc etc. so calling it gothic after gothic architecture was meant to be a huge insult to a genre of these romances that were being written by women, and then men strolled in and gave their gothic works the classical distinction of novels.

so anyway. yeah. sexism.

—-

*but anyone who’s read gothic fiction, by men or women, knows that it’s just a huge vat of seeping, garish absurdity (and it’s marvellous.) so really, who were these dudes kidding.

(via iguanamouth)

Oct 14

octoswan:

[x]

(via congalineofdurin)

Oct 14

thefrogman:

There is also a death for the immortal jellyfish. He is very bored.

Artwork by Chris Gugliotti [webcomic | tumblr]

Oct 14

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Glorious Biology GIFs Visualize The Secrets To Animal Flight

Seattle-based artist and recent University of Washington graduate Eleanor Lutz has decided to spend a year combining her two passions: design and biology. To bring the two seemingly disparate fields together, she started her own infographic design project, a science illustration blog chock full of GIF deconstructions of human and animal behavior. Combining Photoshop, Illustrator, and a Wacom drawing tablet, Lutz has so far completed four installments of her animated infographic series, and shared them on Tabletop Whale, her project blog.

Lutz’s first blog post, entitled “A Visual Compendium of Glowing Creatures”, was published on July 21st of this year. 200 sources and a 468 page textbook later, Lutz’s final product, a poster of bioluminescent organisms, glows with detailed illustrations and biological profiles of each organism. This past month, Lutz followed up her debut with 25 GIF infographic, A User’s Guide to the Human Body: The Muscle Edition, and an animated chart of 42 North American butterflies. It’s a glorious marriage of science and art, and we can’t wait to see what Lutz will illustrate next.

(via iguanamouth)

modcarousel:

Atomic Cosmetics has unexpectedly lost their financial backing! Please donate to help save all of our faces! http://www.gofundme.com/ftvozs
Oct 14

modcarousel:

Atomic Cosmetics has unexpectedly lost their financial backing! Please donate to help save all of our faces! http://www.gofundme.com/ftvozs

Oct 14

spookybluebox:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:

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Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.image

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LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONEimage

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LOOK

(via primadonna-grrrl)