Minge Marauder

missworld:

neutresex:

Black History month with Ruth Ellis.

Ruth Ellis (1899 – 2000) dedicated countless years of service to her community, and particularly black LGBT youth. In 1937 Ruth moved to Detroit with her partner Babe, the two bought a house, which from 1946 to 1971 was known as the “Gay Spot.” Not only did their home serve as a safe space for Detroit’s LGBT community, but the couple also offered lodging and support to many black LGBT youth in need. In a time before the Gay Civil Rights Movement began Ruth was a beacon of light for many LGBT youth who found themselves in the dark. In 1999 The Ruth Ellis Center was founded in Detroit, MI, which continues to offer lodging and support to LGBT youth in need. She continued working with LGBT organizations until her death in 2000 at an age of 101.


LEARN.
Sep 21

missworld:

neutresex:

Black History month with Ruth Ellis.

Ruth Ellis (1899 – 2000) dedicated countless years of service to her community, and particularly black LGBT youth. In 1937 Ruth moved to Detroit with her partner Babe, the two bought a house, which from 1946 to 1971 was known as the “Gay Spot.” Not only did their home serve as a safe space for Detroit’s LGBT community, but the couple also offered lodging and support to many black LGBT youth in need. In a time before the Gay Civil Rights Movement began Ruth was a beacon of light for many LGBT youth who found themselves in the dark. In 1999 The Ruth Ellis Center was founded in Detroit, MI, which continues to offer lodging and support to LGBT youth in need. She continued working with LGBT organizations until her death in 2000 at an age of 101.

LEARN.

(Source: tranqualizer, via mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers)

Sep 21

jackpowerx:

stfurapeculture:

nezua:

negresse-intensa:

theyoungradical:

theneighbourhoodsuperhero:

Omar Khadr, a sixteen year old Guantanamo Bay detainee weeps uncontrollably, clutching at his face and hair as he calls out for his mother to save him from his torment. “Ya Ummi, Ya Ummi (Oh Mother, Oh Mother),” he wails repeatedly, hauntingly with each breath he takes.

The surveillance tapes, released by Khadr’s defence, show him left alone in an interrogation room for a “break” after he tried complaining to CSIS (Canadian Security Intelligence Service) officers about his poor health due to insufficient medical attention. Ignoring his complaints and trying to get him to make false confessions, the officers get frustrated with the sixteen year old’s tears and tell him to get himself together by the time they come back from their break.

“You don’t care about me. Nobody cares about me,” he sobs to them.

The tapes show how the officers manipulated Khadr into thinking that they were helping him because they were also Canadian and how they taunted him with the prospect of home (Canada), (good) food, and familial reunion.

Khadr, a Canadian, was taken into US custody at the age of fifteen, tortured and refused medical attention because he wouldn’t attest to being a member of Al Qaeda, even though he was shot three times in the chest and had shrapnel embedded in his eyes and right shoulder. As a result, Khadr’s left eye is now permanently blind, the vision in his right eye is deteriorating, he develops severe pain in his right shoulder when the temperature drops, and he suffers from extreme nightmares.

He has been incarcerated at Guantanamo Bay since 2002, suffering extremely harsh interrogations and torture (methods), and is now 25 years old.

27 now, and still imprisoned

i’m in complete shock. i’m so nauseous right now. how is this possible? i don’t know what to do w/ this information. i share it because i can’t imagine that anyone else knows about this. the boy has been incarcerated, tortured, and basically maimed allll w/out a trial. my heart hurts :/

Empire.

Omar is no longer in Guantanamo. Left without options, he pled guilty to war crimes so that he’d be given an eight year sentence and be able to transfer to a prison in Canada. He remains in prison there. His story is absolutely heartbreaking. This was a 15 year old boy who has been described as crying out for his mother, who slept holding a Mickey Mouse book one of his captors gave him. A teenager taken from his family, tortured, humiliated, threatened with rape, and falsely imprisoned for 12 years now. You can help Omar by writing to him, donating for his defense, and signing petitions for him. Please visit http://freeomarakhadr.com to learn more.

Look at these pictures. Burn the images into your minds.

This is the War on Terror.

Much like the War on Drugs, it aims to create prisoners rather than stop what it portends to be at war with.

Confining, torturing, and entrapping innocent people does not keep one person safe from any terror threat.

Not.

A single.

One.

This is what happens when “success” is measured by arrests and convictions. 

This is a microcosm of what we as a society - in the US and in any nation that explicitly or tacitly supports these tactics - has become.

We can’t be silent. We have to end this. We’re the only ones who can, because governments aren’t going to stop it - primarily because they’re the ones doing it.

(via primadonna-grrrl)

weneedart:

funnyandhilarious: Dumping Paper Airplanes
Sep 21

weneedart:

funnyandhilariousDumping Paper Airplanes

(via mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers)

dagger-kitsune:

baelor:

OK SOME REALLY SERIOUS SHIT IS HAPPENING IN NORTH KOREA
According to South Korean newspapers, last week the North Korean government PUBLICLY EXECUTED 80 people in 7 cities for watching South Korean/Western shows, movies, and videos, “pornography,” or possessing a Bible.
Apparently people’s attitudes and conformance are changing SO THIS IS HOW THE GOVERNMENT IS TRYING TO SUPPRESS DISOBEDIENCE
They allegedly herded 10,000 innocent civilians into a stadium where they were FORCED TO WATCH THE EXECUTIONS BY MACHINE GUN FIRE
THIS IS HONESTLY SOME HUNGER GAMES SHIT HAPPENING IN REAL LIFE RIGHT NOW
some of the more reputable sources: x, x

Other sources: The Sydney Morning Herald    The Los Angeles Times
Sep 21

dagger-kitsune:

baelor:

OK SOME REALLY SERIOUS SHIT IS HAPPENING IN NORTH KOREA

According to South Korean newspapers, last week the North Korean government PUBLICLY EXECUTED 80 people in 7 cities for watching South Korean/Western shows, movies, and videos, “pornography,” or possessing a Bible.

Apparently people’s attitudes and conformance are changing SO THIS IS HOW THE GOVERNMENT IS TRYING TO SUPPRESS DISOBEDIENCE

They allegedly herded 10,000 innocent civilians into a stadium where they were FORCED TO WATCH THE EXECUTIONS BY MACHINE GUN FIRE

THIS IS HONESTLY SOME HUNGER GAMES SHIT HAPPENING IN REAL LIFE RIGHT NOW

some of the more reputable sources: x, x

Other sources: The Sydney Morning Herald    The Los Angeles Times

(via pulp-fact)

prettybluescarf:

“The collapse of a shark tank at The Scientific Center in Kuwait. Share this because it’s probably the only time in your life you will see something like this.”
Sep 20

prettybluescarf:

“The collapse of a shark tank at The Scientific Center in Kuwait. Share this because it’s probably the only time in your life you will see something like this.”

(via raresenses)

lostinurbanism:

Ghana (1970)
Photograph by Owen Franken 
Sep 19

lostinurbanism:

Ghana (1970)

Photograph by Owen Franken 

(via raresenses)

postracialcomments:

quietlyexhale:

nishnasty:

#Repost from @junglebarbiejulia FULL STORY. On the night of August 10 2013 I went to DC for my birthday to go to “Park Place”, an upscale restaurant. Upon my arrival at the entrance, at 11:30pm, before going to stand in the very long line I went to ask a patrolling officer where a nearby restroom was and before I could utter the words, I was met with an elbow and a right punch to my face. I was instantly knock out. My police report (which has changed numerous times this year) say I was arrest and processed at 1:50 am which is 2 hours that I was unaccounted for. I was left on the floor and when I woke up I was bleeding in multiple places with drag marks on my toes, my wrist were cut by the cuffs, the back of my head and arms were lumpy. The officers wouldn’t tell me why I was in jail and I overheard them saying what should we charge her with? We can’t say domestic, we don’t know who she is with. After pleading and begging to go to the hospital, I was met with more hostility before they finally let me go to the hospital the next days upon my release I had a rape kit done because I don’t know any thing that happened to me while knocked out and it came back positive for semen. They sent messages from my phone while I was detained. Internal Affairs came and confiscated my clothing (they never returned them) and they stole my rape kit. As of today I am facing charges for fighting a bouncer outside of the Lima Club, I was never there and its 5 minutes away from Park driving, also 5 officers that responded after I punched the manager to I was apparently Mike Tyson because when I woke up in jail I had the strength and gumption to fight some more officers in there. When the video was requested both clubs said they lost them. They follow me and stalk my home to this day, I have caught DC police trying to get in my home when they thought I had left, even the Baltimore cops help protect them, one in the rape department even asked me out on a date while my face was still battered. I have been trying to tell my story on IG only to find that police officers or this hired by then have been spamming my hashtag #justiceforjulia with blasphemous pictures. Please share her story.

postracialcomments

BOOST!!!!!
This is the video from the stills posted!!!
https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=679216132168166&set=vb.159600104129774&type=2&theater
Spread this around!!!
Sep 19

postracialcomments:

quietlyexhale:

nishnasty:

#Repost from @junglebarbiejulia FULL STORY. On the night of August 10 2013 I went to DC for my birthday to go to “Park Place”, an upscale restaurant. Upon my arrival at the entrance, at 11:30pm, before going to stand in the very long line I went to ask a patrolling officer where a nearby restroom was and before I could utter the words, I was met with an elbow and a right punch to my face. I was instantly knock out. My police report (which has changed numerous times this year) say I was arrest and processed at 1:50 am which is 2 hours that I was unaccounted for. I was left on the floor and when I woke up I was bleeding in multiple places with drag marks on my toes, my wrist were cut by the cuffs, the back of my head and arms were lumpy. The officers wouldn’t tell me why I was in jail and I overheard them saying what should we charge her with? We can’t say domestic, we don’t know who she is with. After pleading and begging to go to the hospital, I was met with more hostility before they finally let me go to the hospital the next days upon my release I had a rape kit done because I don’t know any thing that happened to me while knocked out and it came back positive for semen. They sent messages from my phone while I was detained. Internal Affairs came and confiscated my clothing (they never returned them) and they stole my rape kit. As of today I am facing charges for fighting a bouncer outside of the Lima Club, I was never there and its 5 minutes away from Park driving, also 5 officers that responded after I punched the manager to I was apparently Mike Tyson because when I woke up in jail I had the strength and gumption to fight some more officers in there. When the video was requested both clubs said they lost them. They follow me and stalk my home to this day, I have caught DC police trying to get in my home when they thought I had left, even the Baltimore cops help protect them, one in the rape department even asked me out on a date while my face was still battered. I have been trying to tell my story on IG only to find that police officers or this hired by then have been spamming my hashtag #justiceforjulia with blasphemous pictures. Please share her story.

postracialcomments

BOOST!!!!!

This is the video from the stills posted!!!

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=679216132168166&set=vb.159600104129774&type=2&theater

Spread this around!!!

(via raresenses)

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential
When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.
But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.
Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.
The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.
Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.
From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”
“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.
While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.
When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.
“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.
A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.
“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”
Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.
“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.
As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.
The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.
Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.
Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses
Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.
Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook
Sep 17

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential

When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.

But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.

Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.

The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.

Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.

From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”

“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.

While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.

When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.

“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.

A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.

“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”

Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.

“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.

As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.

The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.

Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.

Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.

Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.

Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

(via doughyzeschanel)

Sep 16

actegratuit:

Hope Gangloff

(via doughyzeschanel)

feelinranty:


necessary-sass:

curlybrownboy:

belindapendragon:

kobetyrant:

HOW IS THIS NOT EVERYWHERE?

Reblogging this good news…again.

y’all know EXACTLY why this isn’t everywhere. don’t pretend to be oblivious

Well let’s spread the word then guys. This kid deserves all the attention.

"Ramarni, what will you do when you grow up?"
"Literally everything."
So excited when I hear stories like this because imagine what he will accomplish
Sep 16

feelinranty:

necessary-sass:

curlybrownboy:

belindapendragon:

kobetyrant:

HOW IS THIS NOT EVERYWHERE?

Reblogging this good news…again.

y’all know EXACTLY why this isn’t everywhere. don’t pretend to be oblivious

Well let’s spread the word then guys. This kid deserves all the attention.

"Ramarni, what will you do when you grow up?"

"Literally everything."

So excited when I hear stories like this because imagine what he will accomplish

(Source: lawdgevus, via whiteguiltconfessionals)